Kosovo Google map

This picture shows the draft map of Kosovo, Europe. For more details of the map of Kosovo, please see this post below. This picture shows the location Kosovo, Europe. For more geographical details of Kosovo, please see this post below. This picture shows the flag of Kosovo, Europe. For more details of the flag of Kosovo, please see this post below.
Borderline map of Kosovo Location map of Kosovo Flag of Kosovo

Kosovo Google map

Google maps, short information, Hotel Booking and detailed facts of Kosovo, (). This page enables you to explore Kosovo and its border countries (location: Southeast Europe, between Serbia and Macedonia) through detailed Satellite imagery - fast and easy as never before Google maps. Find comprehensive information below about the country () in its diversity: geography, economy, science, people, culture, environment, government and history - All in One on Driving Directions and Maps portal!

There is also Street View and free Driving Directions at your service. Your Google Satellite map Sightseeing in Kosovo, Europe starts here!



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Kosovo Google map

The map below shows Kosovo with cities, towns, highways, main roads, streets and Street Views. To find a location, place or landmark, use the following form and click on the "Show Map" button.


 

The Google map above is showing Kosovo in Europe (geographic coordinates: 42 35 N, 21 00 E) with international borders; total: 714 km
Border countries: Albania 112 km, Macedonia 160 km, Montenegro 76 km, Serbia 366 km furthermore inland counties boundaries.

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There is also a free Kosovo Weather / cloude map, Kosovo Traffic map and Kosovo Transit map at your service!

The map of Kosovo, Europe is informational use only. No representation is made or warranty given as to any map or its content by Driving Directions and Maps site. User assumes all risk of use of this Kosovo Google map and facts/wiki page.


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Short facts about Kosovo, Europe

Name of the country: Kosovo Abbrevation of Kosovo: Kosovo Capital of Kosovo: Name: Pristina (Prishtine, Prishtina)
geographic coordinates: 42 40 N, 21 10 E
time difference: UTC+1 (6 hours ahead of Washington, DC during Standard Time)
daylight saving time: +1hr, begins last Sunday in March; ends last Sunday in October
Located: Europe Land area: total: 10,887 sq km
land: 10,887 sq km
water: 0 sq km
Location: Southeast Europe, between Serbia and Macedonia
Geographic coordinates: 42 35 N, 21 00 E Terrain: flat fluvial basin with an elevation of 400-700 m above sea level surrounded by several high mountain ranges with elevations of 2,000 to 2,500 m
Area comparative: slightly larger than Delaware
Population: 1859203 Population grow rate: Sex ratio: at birth: 1.08 male(s)/female
0-14 years: 1.08 male(s)/female
15-24 years: 1.11 male(s)/female
25-54 years: 1.12 male(s)/female
55-64 years: 1.06 male(s)/female
65 years and over: 0.73 male(s)/female
total population: 1.06 male(s)/female (2014 estimated)
Exports: $408 million (2013 estimated)

$382.8 million (2012 estimated)

Imports: $3.398 billion (2013 estimated)

$3.477 billion (2012 estimated)

Import partners: Germany 11.9%, Macedonia 11.5%, Serbia 11.1%, Italy 8.5%, Turkey 9%, China 6.4%, Albania 4.4% (2012 estimated)
Urbanization: Airports: 6 (2013) Climate: influenced by continental air masses resulting in relatively cold winters with heavy snowfall and hot, dry summers and autumns; Mediterranean and alpine influences create regional variation; maximum rainfall between October and December

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About Kosovo

The central Balkans were part of the Roman and Byzantine Empires before ethnic Serbs migrated to the territories of modern Kosovo in the 7th century. During the medieval period, Kosovo became the center of a Serbian Empire and saw the construction of many important Serb religious sites, including many architecturally significant Serbian Orthodox monasteries. The defeat of Serbian forces at the Battle of Kosovo in 1389 led to five centuries of Ottoman rule during which large numbers of Turks and Albanians moved to Kosovo. By the end of the 19th century, Albanians replaced the Serbs as the dominant ethnic group in Kosovo. Serbia reacquired control over Kosovo from the Ottoman Empire during the First Balkan War of 1912. After World War II, Kosovo became an autonomous province of Serbia in the Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia (S.F.R.Y.) with status almost equivalent to that of a republic under the 1974 S.F.R.Y. constitution. Despite legislative concessions, Albanian nationalism increased in the 1980s, which led to riots and calls for Kosovo's independence. At the same time, Serb nationalist leaders, such as Slobodan MILOSEVIC, exploited Kosovo Serb claims of maltreatment to secure votes from supporters, many of whom viewed Kosovo as their cultural heartland. Under MILOSEVIC's leadership, Serbia instituted a new constitution in 1989 that revoked Kosovo's status as an autonomous province of Serbia. Kosovo's Albanian leaders responded in 1991 by organizing a referendum that declared Kosovo independent. Under MILOSEVIC, Serbia carried out repressive measures against the Kosovar Albanians in the early 1990s as the unofficial Kosovo government, led by Ibrahim RUGOVA, used passive resistance in an attempt to try to gain international assistance and recognition of an independent Kosovo. Albanians dissatisfied with RUGOVA's passive strategy in the 1990s created the Kosovo Liberation Army and launched an insurgency. Starting in 1998, Serbian military, police, and paramilitary forces under MILOSEVIC conducted a brutal counterinsurgency campaign that resulted in massacres and massive expulsions of ethnic Albanians. Approximately 800,000 ethnic Albanians were forced from their homes in Kosovo during this time. International attempts to mediate the conflict failed, and MILOSEVIC's rejection of a proposed settlement led to a three-month NATO military operation against Serbia beginning in March 1999 that forced Serbia to agree to withdraw its military and police forces from Kosovo. UN Security Council Resolution 1244 (1999) placed Kosovo under a transitional administration, the UN Interim Administration Mission in Kosovo (UNMIK), pending a determination of Kosovo's future status. A UN-led process began in late 2005 to determine Kosovo's final status. The negotiations ran in stages between 2006 and 2007, but ended without agreement between Belgrade and Pristina. On 17 February 2008, the Kosovo Assembly declared Kosovo independent. Since then, over 100 countries have recognized Kosovo, and it has joined the International Monetary Fund, World Bank, European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, the Council of Europe Development Bank, and signed a framework agreement with the European Investment Bank (EIB). In October 2008, Serbia sought an advisory opinion from the International Court of Justice (ICJ) on the legality under international law of Kosovo's declaration of independence. The ICJ released the advisory opinion in July 2010 affirming that Kosovo's declaration of independence did not violate general principles of international law, UN Security Council Resolution 1244, or the Constitutive Framework. The opinion was closely tailored to Kosovo's unique history and circumstances. Serbia continues to reject Kosovo's independence, but the two countries reached an agreement to normalize their relations in April 2013 through EU-facilitated talks and are currently engaged in the implementation process.

About the flag of Kosovo: centered on a dark blue field is the geographical shape of Kosovo in a gold color surmounted by six white, five-pointed stars arrayed in a slight arc; each star represents one of the major ethnic groups of Kosovo: Albanians, Serbs, Turks, Gorani, Roma, and Bosniaks

Read further for many more aspects of Kosovo and its administrative divisions here.


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Kosovo hotels

Low rates, no booking fees, no cancellation fees!

Driving Directions and Maps.com in partnership with hundreds of travel portals and booking agencies offers highly competitive rates for all types of accommodations in Kosovo, from affordable B&Bs and apartments to the most luxurious hotels throughout Kosovo. In corporation with Expedia.com, Hotels.com, Booking.com and the major of the leading Online Travel Agencies (OTA), we are one of the most complete resource of Europe’s online hotel reservations.

At Driving Directions you won't be charged any booking fees, cancellation fees, or administration fees – the reservation service is free of charge and secure!

We have also put together a carefully selected list of recommended hotels in Kosovo, only accommodations with the highest level of guest satisfaction are included. Luxury hotels (including 5 star hotels and 4 star hotels) and low budget hotels in Kosovo (with best discount rates and up-to-date hotel deals) are both available on demand. Bookmark this page and always keep in mind that with Driving Directions the best hotel price is guaranteed!

 

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Detailed facts of Kosovo

Geographical details of Kosovo

Area: total: 10,887 sq km
land: 10,887 sq km
water: 0 sq km

Area - comparative: slightly larger than Delaware

Climate: influenced by continental air masses resulting in relatively cold winters with heavy snowfall and hot, dry summers and autumns; Mediterranean and alpine influences create regional variation; maximum rainfall between October and December

Elevation extremes: lowest point: Drini i Bardhe/Beli Drim 297 m (located on the border with Albania)
highest point: Gjeravica/Deravica 2,656 m

Geography - note:

Irrigated land:

Land use:

Land boundaries: total: 714 km
Border countries: Albania 112 km, Macedonia 160 km, Montenegro 76 km, Serbia 366 km

Lengths of coastline: 0 km (landlocked)

Lengths of waterways:

Location: Southeast Europe, between Serbia and Macedonia

Major urban areas population:

Map references: Europe

Natural hazards:

Natural resources: nickel, lead, zinc, magnesium, lignite, kaolin, chrome, bauxite

Terrain: flat fluvial basin with an elevation of 400-700 m above sea level surrounded by several high mountain ranges with elevations of 2,000 to 2,500 m

Urbanization:


Kosovo and its administrative divisions

37 municipalities (komunat, singular - komuna (Albanian); opstine, singular - opstina (Serbian)); Decan (Decani), Dragash (Dragas), Ferizaj (Urosevac), Fushe Kosove (Kosovo Polje), Gjakove (Dakovica), Gjilan (Gnjilane), Gllogovc (Glogovac), Gracanice (Gracanica), Hani i Elezit (Deneral Jankovic), Istog (Istok), Junik, Kacanik, Kamenice/Dardana (Kamenica), Kline (Klina), Kllokot (Klokot), Leposaviq (Leposavic), Lipjan (Lipljan), Malisheve (Malisevo), Mamushe (Mamusa), Mitrovice (Mitrovica), Novoberde (Novo Brdo), Obiliq (Obilic), Partesh (Partes), Peje (Pec), Podujeve (Podujevo), Prishtine (Pristina), Prizren, Rahovec (Orahovac), Ranillug (Ranilug), Shterpce (Strpce), Shtime (Stimlje), Skenderaj (Srbica), Suhareke (Suva Reka), Viti (Vitina), Vushtrri (Vucitrn), Zubin Potok, Zvecan; note - a 38th municipality (Mitrovica e Veriut/Severna Mitrovica (Mitrovica North)) may have been created; when/if approved by the US Board on Geographic Names it will be added to the above listing.

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